Have you ever gotten that creative high?

Whether it’s writing an article, giving a speech, making a painting, or putting together a meal, it feels good to find yourself in the flow. But, the act of creation goes deeper than that.You want to create because you want meaning.For yourself and others.

That’s what you crave, right?

You want to create because it creates meaning in your life.

It brings purpose. You make an impact.

If ideas and dreams stay in our head and remain unexpressed, we get sad. That’s why I talked about how not creating can lead to depression in my last blog post to you.

As humans, we’re wired to make meaning.

I talk about creating fearlessly because the act of making an idea real and then sharing it with the world can be scary. You put your innermost feelings and ideas out there and risk silence in return.

That  process requires you to make one decision after another — decisions that take courage. A reader asked me why I didn’t address more tactical tips in my last post.In my experience, it doesn’t matter how many productivity tips and creative tricks you’re taught. If the motivation of your creative projects is too tied to an end goal, you won’t continue to create when the results don’t come fast enough.It happened to me.

I’d give up on projects and people because I didn’t see the results soon enough. I’d work tirelessly and then fail to launch.

I’d notice I’d begin to feel anxious and experience stress. I’d start over thinking everything and lose connection to the fun of creating.

I’d start thinking about how much time I’d spent and begin to ask myself, “What if nothing comes of this?”

Eventually, my naysayer mind would talk me into abandoning the project. I feared failure so I’d move on to something else. We try to take short cuts and are easily seduced by hype.

Can you relate?

We know that “failures” are apart of the process. We’ve heard it before so why doesn’t it stick with us?

Results Come in Different Sizes and Shapes

With the right perspective, nothing in life is ever wasted.  If you get too attached to a desired result, you won’t ever continue to create. Most of us abandon projects and businesses right before it’s about to turn the corner.

It requires faith and willpower.


Beethoven would have never created what I think is his best work, Symphony #7, if he’d stopped writing music after he found out he was going deaf. Imagine writing music without being able to hear anything! Millions wouldn’t have been able to enjoy his most moving piece.Just like you won’t have your breakthrough in your business if you don’t stick around long enough to persevere through the bumps along the way.What I’ve discovered is that perseverance has everything to do with finding your own rhythm and structure.

When I get creatively stuck, it’s because that creative side of me craves freedom and doesn’t like structure. And creativity needs structure for it to turn into something real.

Here’s a structure to finding your rhythm:

1) Discover the time of day you’re most creative and least distracted.

2) Set that time aside each day to do your creative project.
3) Practice saying “no” to distractions.
4) Practice saying “yes” to yourself by doing your creative practice even when you aren’t in the mood.
5) Make a ritual out of it.
Sitting is a challenge for me. Sounds funny when I write this, but I need to move and release some excess energy in my body before I sit for long periods of time. I do a short yoga practice or run and then I sit. The upside is that many of my ideas come when I’m not sitting in front of the computer. When I’m giving my brain a rest, ideas come. Play around to find your own rhythm and physiology.6) Make your creativity practice just as important as your urgent tasks.When you have that extensive to-do list of “urgent” tasks that are important to paying the bills, it’s hard to make time for the “important” creative projects.But they are just as important if not more so than the urgent tasks. Creative tasks help you sustain your business long term and evolve you as an entrepreneur. They grow your talents and feed your soul.

Busyness can be a mask for procrastination.

Ask yourself what can I say no to doing that isn’t fueling my focus on what is important to me?

Why a Creativity Practice is Important for Your Brand 

Your brand is about how you package and present your mission in a way that inspires people. It’s your talent presented in a way that evokes an emotion and communicates what you do in a unique way.

And if it stays inside you, people will never be able to experience it.

The clarity and confidence to discover and express your brand doesn’t come overnight. Nurturing your talents through a creativity practice will help you discover your most real brand and your potential.

If you’re a sensitive and creative entrepreneur like me, it’s even more important that we explore and honor our gifts and passions as well as manage and protect our energy.

You may feel scattered because you have lots of interests and skills. The brand strategy process can help focus that into something meaningful to the world.

Your brand is about addressing your whole you — including your personal growth.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, one of the founders of the positive psychology movement and author of the book Flow:The Secret to Happiness did a large study that evaluated what people were doing when they felt most joyful.

The results showed that people felt happiest when challenged in their work. They felt in the flow — fulfilled, strong, creative, and satisfied.

The big paradox is that we seek leisure. When he asked how people felt during free time, generally they felt dull, sad, and dissatisfied.

Interesting, huh!

Creating fearlessly allows us to experience the flow. It’s the sweet spot Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi calls “the border of anxiety and boredom.”

So, what are you doing to nurture your creativity?

What are you doing to challenge yourself?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on work, creativity, and finding your brand along the way.

Let me how I’m doing so I can create more useful articles. Is this helpful?

What do you want to know more about? Hit reply and let me know!Stay tuned for next week article, “How to be so Good No One Can Ignore You.”
If you’re interested in where to focus your skills and creative talents, you’ll want to check it out. It’s going to be good.